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Aerobic Exercise and Weight-Training

Aerobic exercise

Aerobic exercise burns energy and oxygen, through continuous movement of the largest muscles in your body (your thigh muscles). Aerobic activities include bicycling, swimming, jogging, and (a great one for beginners or those who are recovering from illness) walking. If you’re just starting, try 10 minutes a day four days and increase as it feels comfortable until you’re exercising 30 to 60 minutes. Some people find that adding variety to their program (a new route every day; alternating classes and stationary biking) keeps them motivated.

Finding the right pace for aerobic exercise is important. Rambling at too comfortable a pace may not maximize the benefits of aerobic exercising, but overdoing can make exercise “anaerobic” (non-oxygen burning). A good way to make sure you’re exercising aerobically is to measure your heart rate. After exercising, put your fingers (not your thumb!) across your wrist (palm up). Count the number of pulses you feel during 10 seconds, then multiply that by six to convert it to a one-minute heart rate. Keep your exercise heart rate to 55 percent to 80 percent of your estimated maximum heart rate (220 – your age)

If that’s too much math, you can estimate using the sing/talk test. While you’re exercising, carry on a conversation with your gym-buddy or (if you’re exercising at home) sing a song (“Yankee Doodle” works well). If you feel just as you would if not exercising, pick up the pace a tad. If you’re out of breath and having to puff after each word, you’re no longer in the aerobic range – cut back a bit to get the full exercise benefit.

Weight-Training

Strength conditioning can include callisthenics, lifting free-weights, and machine-assisted lifting. Strength condition helps build muscles that can stabilize joints and may help prevent bone loss as you get older.

Strength conditioning seems to help weight loss. Conditioned muscle burns more calories even between aerobic exercise sessions. training seems to assist with retaining if you’re And if you’re on a reduced calorie (weight reduction) diet, weight training may help you lose more fat and less lean muscle.

Some women are nervous about weight bearing exercise because they are afraid of getting “too bulky” or looking “too masculine.” Not to worry: men make testosterone in large amounts, which may contribute to that sort of muscular development; women generally don’t respond to strength training the same way and are more likely to lose inches as they work out.